Kimberley partnership a win for bandicoots, quolls and cattle

Kimberley partnership a win for bandicoots, quolls and cattle
Sanctuary
Charnley River – Artesian Range
Wildlife
Golden-backed Tree-rat | Western Quoll / Chuditch | Golden Bandicoot | Monjon

A ground-breaking partnership between the non-profit Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) and Australian Capital Equity (ACE) is set to deliver a win for conservation and the regional economy in Australia’s remote Kimberley region.

Read the full story in the West Australian

April 2017: Under the deal, AWC has sold its high quality Brahman cattle herd, and is subleasing a portion of Charnley River Station, to ACE. It is the first significant deal of its kind between a conservation organisation and a major pastoral company.

AWC Chief Executive, Atticus Fleming, said the deal paved the way for an expansion of AWC’s conservation activities on the 300,000 hectare Charnley River.

“The deal will help AWC focus on our core business – saving endangered wildlife through effective fire management and feral animal control - while ACE improves the sustainability of the cattle operation that must be maintained at Charnley River under pastoral legislation.”

ACE Chairman, Kerry Stokes, welcomed the injection of quality Brahman cattle into the existing ACE herd in the Kimberley, and said the deal showcases ACE’s commitment to sustainable land management.

“The size of the herd pastured on Charnley River will be reduced to sustainable levels and a major fencing program will restrict the herd to less than 20% of the property, excluding cattle from key riparian (river) systems and areas that are important for endangered species like the Northern Quoll.”

Atticus Fleming said the additional fencing and control on cattle movement will help protect some of the highest value land for conservation on mainland Australia, including habitat for threatened mammals such as the Golden-backed Tree-rat, the Golden Bandicoot and the Monjon (the world’s smallest rock-wallaby).

The Charnley deal is part of a broader collaboration between AWC and ACE on fire management, feral animal control, weed control and threatened species conservation in the Kimberley. The two organisations manage a combined area of around 2.5 million hectares in the region.