Long-nosed Bandicoots to reveal importance of fire management at North Head

Long-nosed Bandicoots to reveal importance of fire management at North Head
Sanctuary
North Head
Field Program
Science: surveys and research
Wildlife
Long-nosed Bandicoot

March 2015: AWC ecologists recently captured 15 individuals of the Long-nosed Bandicoot at North Head Wildlife Sanctuary as part of our research on the role of fire management in restoring and maintaining habitat quality in the endangered Eastern Suburbs Banksia Scrub ecological community.

The bandicoot survey was conducted prior to a proposed prescribed burn in order to measure bandicoot abundance and the habitat complexity of the areas they inhabit.  Following the prescribed burn, AWC will undertake additional surveys to identify the impact of fire management on foraging habitat and plant diversity, and its effect on the Long-nosed Bandicoot population.

The Long-nosed Bandicoots were surveyed across three sites – a control site, a previously burnt site and a site to be selectively burnt – each comprising six traps along two transects.  Our ongoing monitoring program at North Head suggests the bandicoot population is stable.  Improving habitat quality is critical to increasing the population and ultimately restoring other mammals that are currently extinct in the Sydney region.

AWC intern releases a Long-nosed Bandicoot during a survey at North Head - J Anson - copyright AWC

AWC intern, Sarah Allison, releasing a Long-nosed Bandicoot - J Anson